History Of The Chamber

Our journey began on March 12, 1900, when 37 Japanese merchants assembled in Honolulu to respond to a crisis that had struck two months earlier. City health officials had deliberately set Honolulu’s Chinatown district ablaze to try to control an outbreak of the bubonic plague. Fanned by brisk winds, the fire had burned out of control.

By the time authorities were able to contain the inferno, a large section of Honolulu had burned to the ground. Six thousand people were left without shelter, food, clothing or supplies – more than half of them Japanese immigrants who looked to their fellow compatriots for assistance.

Motivated by a spirit of benevolence and pride in their community, the merchants formed the Honolulu Nippon Jin Shonin Doshikai (Honolulu Japanese Merchants Association). The association moved swiftly to assist the Japanese victims, helping them file claims with the government, and find shelter, food and supplies.

The organization continued to grow, prompting the group to change its name to the Honolulu Japanese Chamber of Commerce. In its early years, the Chamber was made up entirely of importers and wholesalers. In 1912, the Chamber decided that promotion of trade and goodwill between Japan and Hawaii would be its primary mission. The organization continued to operate as such until 1939.

Realizing that a broader membership base would strengthen the group’s presence in the local community, the Chamber members decided to join forces with the Japanese Merchants Association, an influential organization comprised of retailers. This merger would bring the Honolulu Japanese Chamber of Commerce to the forefront as one of Hawaii’s leading business groups, actively promoting goodwill in the Pacific.

However, the dark clouds of war would soon rain on the Islands. The activities of the Chamber came to an abrupt halt in the hysteria-filled days following the attack on Pearl Harbor. Many of the Chamber’s officers, prominent members and key personnel were arrested and incarcerated at Sand Island or Honouliuli in West Oahu. Some were later transferred to Mainland internment camps.

The Chamber remained inactive throughout World War II, finally resuming activities in 1947. Very discreetly, the organization changed its name to the Honolulu Businessmen’s Association.

U.S.-Japan relations improved in the postwar years, and, in 1948, the association returned to its earlier name, the Honolulu Japanese Chamber of Commerce.

Postwar Hawai’i saw a new generation of Japanese come of age. They were nisei, American-born men and women of Japanese ancestry. Nisei members assumed leadership roles in the HJCC, carrying on the vision and fulfilling the commitment of their issei predecessors, while also setting their own goals to move the organization forward.

They fulfilled one of their major goals in 1960 with the construction of a cultural hall, teahouse and HJCC office building in Moili’ili. The facility became the setting for Japanese cultural and community activities, HJCC business, as well as activities for the general public. In an effort to develop ties beyond the local Japanese community, the HJCC became an associate member of the Chamber of Commerce of Hawaii in 1968.

In the ensuing decades, the Chamber widened its focus. It rewrote its charter to express the urgency felt by its leaders regarding the development of a cultural center to preserve the legacy of the Japanese in Hawaii for the younger generations. This concept was shared with other Japanese community organizations. Their combined efforts resulted in the establishment in 1988 of the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii (JCCH). In an effort to provide a sound beginning for the cultural center, the Chamber donated its property as a demonstration of its commitment to the project.

In recognition of the 100th anniversary of the founding of the HJCC, the Hiroshima Chamber of Commerce and Industry (HCCI) made a commitment or “moku roku” in May 2000.  With the donations from the HCCI, Hiroshima Prefectural Government and Hiroshima City, the construction of the torii gate was completed and a dedication ceremony was held on January 22, 2002.  The gate is located in the triangle park at the corner of South King and South Beretania streets.  In February 2002, the HJCC “gifted” the gate to the City and County of Honolulu (CCH).  The HJCC “adopted” the gate from the CCH under the City’s “Adopt-A-Sculpture” Program to maintain the gate.

More than a century later and with its eyes firmly fixed to the future – the Honolulu Japanese Chamber of Commerce seeks to integrate the dynamic areas of business and economic development, international relations and government affairs.

歴史

1900年3月12日、その2ヵ月前に起きた事件に対処するため37人の日系商人たちが集まり、ホノルル日本人商工会議所の歴史が始まりました。2ヵ月前に、当時猛威をふるっていたペストの流行を抑えるため、ホノルル市衛生局がチャイナタウンを焼き払ったのです。折からの強風にあおられ、火はまたたく間に広がりました。

当局が大火災を鎮火したときには、すでにホノルル市のかなり広い地域が焼け落ちていました。市民6,000人が家も家財道具も失いました。そして、その多くが日系移民だったのです。被災した日系人たちは、同胞の日系人に支援を求めました。

日系人コミュニティの絆に支えられ、商人たちはホノルル日本人商人同志会を発足させました。同志会はすぐに日本人被被災者の救援活動にのりだし、行政機関への補償請求、仮住居や食料の調達などを支援しました。

同志会はその後も発展を続け、名称をホノルル日本人商工会議所に改称。初期の会員は輸入業者と卸販売業者が大半を占めていました。1912年、そのミッションを日本・ハワイ間の貿易と親善の促進と制定し、1939年までそうした活動が続きました。

商工会議所の会員たちは、地域社会での影響力を強めるためには会員層の幅を広げることが重要だと考え、有力な小売業団体である日本人商人協会と提携することを決定しました。この合併により、ホノルル日本人商工会議所はハワイ有数のビジネス団体となり、太平洋地区の親善に力を入れるようになっていったのです。

しかし、まもなくハワイは戦争の暗雲に覆われてしまいます。真珠湾攻撃の後、ホノルル日本人商工会議所は活動停止に追い込まれました。ホノルル日本人商工会議所の役員、有力会員、重要人物の多くが拘束されてオアフ島のサンドアイランドやホノウリウリにある強制収容所へ送られました。アメリカ本土の収容所へ移送された会員もいました。

第二次世界大戦中、ホノルル日本人商工会議所の活動は中止され、ようやく再開したのは1947年になってからでした。慎重を期して、名称はホノルル・ビジネスマン・アソシエーションに変更しました。

戦後の日米関係の改善に伴い、1948年には以前のホノルル日本人商工会議所の名称が復活しました。

ハワイでは戦後、日系人の新しい世代が活躍するようになりました。彼らはアメリカ生まれの日系二世です。二世の会員たちは、商工会議所のリーダーシップをとるようになると、一世たちのビジョンと責任を果たしながら、新しい目標を設定して商工会議所をさらに前進させたのです。

1960年には、モイリイリに文化ホール、茶室、商工会議所オフィスビルを建設。この施設は、日本文化とコミュニティ活動、商工会議所活動、そして一般の市民活動の場となりました。また、地域日系社会の枠を超えた活動をめざし、1968年にハワイ商工会議所に加盟しました。

その後、ホノルル日本人商工会議所の活動範囲はよりいっそう広がっていきました。ハワイの日系人の伝統を若い世代へ受け継ぐために、文化センターの建設が急務となりました。この発案は他の日系団体からも支持され、1988年に日本文化センターが設立されました。文化センターの運営を軌道に乗せ、プロジェクトを全面的に支援するため、ホノルル日本人商工会議所は商工会議所ビルを日本文化センターに寄付しました。

2000年5月、ホノルル日本人商工会議所の創立100周年を記念して、広島商工会議所が目録を作成しました。広島商工会議所、広島県、広島市の寄付により、鳥居が建立され、2002年1月22日に式典が開催されました。鳥居は、サウス・キング・ストリートとサウス・ベレタニア・ストリート角のトライアングル公園にあります。2002年2月、ホノルル日本人商工会議所は鳥居をホノルル市に寄贈しました。その後、ホノルル市の建造物継承プログラムにより、ホノルル日本人商工会議所が鳥居を受け継いでいます。

設立から1世紀以上を経て、ホノルル日本人商工会議所は将来を展望し、産業経済開発、国際関係、政府関係の分野を統合して貢献を続けていきます。